JNG’s Weekly Round-Up ~ What I Read This Week

Happy Sunday, dear Readers!

I managed to finish two short novels this week. I wrote short reviews of both of them on Goodreads, but thought it would be a good idea to also post them here on the blog.

Top Ten by Katie Cotugno

I liked this book in spite of myself.

In spite of Gabby being snarky about 90% of the time.

In spite of the overuse of the words “dude” and “intellectually”.

In spite of the fact that there is a bisexual female lead character (finally!) who doesn’t get a single chance to express to the reader why or how she arrived at these feelings and this awesome sense of self-acceptance, even though that sort of storyline would have been 10 times more fascinating than the cliché 80’s movie one we got.

In spite of the constant fighting and immature bickering of the two best friends/pseudo-lovers.

In spite of a portrayal of anxiety that felt (to this reader who suffers from anxiety) to be oversimplified and that focused too much on Gabby blaming and hating herself for having a mental illness, rather than accepting it and choosing to love and take care of herself. And in spite of the use of the word “panicker” in place of “panic attack” (ew!).

In spite of the jarring timeline.

In spite of the strangely first person-esque third person narration.

And finally, in spite of my eventual realization, in the end, that nothing really happened at all and that the characters didn’t grow one bit.

❥❥❥ (out of 5)

 

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn

Sharp Objects is:
Addictive | Thrilling | Unsettling | Upsetting | Traumatic | Chilling | Haunting | Gross | Emotional | Visceral | Grotesque | Disgusting | Sticky | Suffocating | Messy | Messed Up | Frightening | Fascinating | Terrifying

Many of these words might be written on main character Camille Preaker’s skin. Or, I should say more accurately, carved into. That image in itself portrays how graphic Sharp Objects is, and how much of the novel is truly felt by the reader, almost physically. Sharp Objects, but more particularly Camille Preaker’s narration, got under my skin and made me queasy and tingly, and I think the true power and profundity of Sharp Objects is not in its plot (which is quite a run of the mill murder mystery) but instead in its telling, in its characters and their flawed psychologies, in Camille’s unvarnished speech and honesty. Reading Sharp Objects felt like being confided in, even as so much of me wanted to run from the secrets and inner thoughts that were being revealed.
❥❥❥ (out of 5)

Have a lovely day and week ahead! xo

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

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