Two Quick Reviews on a Sunny Sunday ~ #JNGReads

Happy Sunday everyone!

I just wanted to plop two short reviews on here today, to wrap up my reading from this week. I also managed to finish P.S. I Still love You by Jenny Han this week, and you can read my longer review of it here, if you’re interested.

The Rome Affair by Karen Swan

I really enjoyed The Rome Affair, but I do have to admit that it isn’t my favourite Karen Swan novel that I’ve read recently. Although the plot was intricate, suspenseful and engaging, for some reason I just didn’t get as deeply invested in it as I did with novels like The Summer Without You and The Paris Secret. I also didn’t feel myself becoming as connected to the main character, Cesca, as I did with Cassie in Christmas at Tiffany’s (probably my favourite Karen Swan book I’ve read so far). If I had to compare this book to the others in Swan’s catalogue, I’d say it’s on par with The Greek Escape in that it was full of surprises, but not an absolute standout for me.

The Rome Affair also felt very similar, in my opinion, to Taylor Jenkins Reid’s acclaimed novel The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. Indeed, the premises of the two novels are almost identical, and the only real difference for me was that I liked Elena of The Rome Affair far less than I liked Evelyn Hugo. Elena comes across as infuriatingly guarded and deceitful and it is extremely difficult to warm up to her, and I think that is one of the factors that made me feel less connected to the book overall. That being said, I did still enjoy The Rome Affair immensely because Karen Swan’s quintessential writing style is still present and it always manages to whisk me away immediately.

I would definitely recommend The Rome Affair as a great travel read, something perfect to pack in a carry-on or beach bag. However, if you’re looking to get a true taste for how marvelous and magical Karen Swan’s writing is, I’d recommend starting with something like Christmas at Tiffany’s instead.

❥❥❥❥❥ (out of 5)

Love Letters of Great Men and Women edited by Ursula Doyle

This collection was, unfortunately, very disappointing to me. I picked it up randomly a few years ago and never got around to reading it, and I can’t say that I was really anxious to pick it up, but I did think it would be a lot more compelling and romantic than it was. My main issue with the collection is that I did not consider most of the letters to actually be love letters – on the contrary, most of them were very generic, and although I would’ve expected more from some of the great poets and writers included in the just over 300 pages, I found that the majority of the letters failed to touch me in any way whatsoever.

Oddly enough, I found myself most interested in the biographies and short histories of each letter writer more than the actual letters themselves. However, I found that in most cases, the histories barely related whatsoever to the actual letters, and one seemingly minor person that was mentioned in the vast history of a writer’s life could end up being the recipient of the chosen letter without me having any idea why. I did find that I learned quite a bit from the biographies, though, so they were worth reading in that sense.

One thing that also surprised me is that I found myself moved by letters written by people I had never even heard of, more so than by letters written by figures I was familiar with. For example, I bookmarked letters written by Daniel Webster and Pierre Currie on the men’s side, and Mary Hutchinson, Claire Clairmont, Clara Wieck and Rosa Luxemburg on the women’s side without having ever heard of them prior to picking up this collection. For some reason, their letters had more of an impact on me than any others, and as you can probably surmise from this list, I found the letters written by the women included in the book to be much more emotional and interesting than those written by the men.

I will say that I was very entertained by reading the letters by Maria Branwell (mother of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë), as well as Queen Victoria. Maria’s letters sounded almost like they could’ve come from the pages of Jane Eyre (which I guess makes a lot of sense, in that her writing style is very similar to Charlotte’s), and Queen Victoria’s letter of grief after Prince Albert’s death was one of the most memorable of the entire collection and one I was particularly interested in. (Sidenote: I did find myself wondering, though, why none of Charlotte Brontë’s letters to her French professor Monsieur Héger were included in this collection, since her love for him was quite well-documented and historically significant.)

All in all, I don’t know if I can recommend this collection because it just didn’t really satisfy me in any way. I feel that I could’ve found many of the historical details myself through a quick Google search, and the letters just weren’t interesting or profound enough to make picking up this specific collection seem all that worthwhile, sadly.

❥❥ (out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

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