P.S. I Still Love You ~ #JNGReads

Unfortunately, I have to say that I was not a fan of P.S. I Still Love You. My feelings toward this YA novel were really disappointing because I remember reading the first book in the trilogy, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, around 2 years ago and liking it a lot. I distinctly recall that my husband and I were sitting in our favourite Starbucks location downtown and it was a beautiful summer day, and I blasted through the book in one sitting. It was endearing and adorable and I really liked the Covey family and the unique bond between the three sisters and their father, and I thought the premise of the story was very interesting and unique and a lot of fun.

Sadly, I cannot say the same thing for P.S. I Still Love You. To summarize what I’m going to go into more detail about in this review, this sequel very much felt like it was written for the sake of it. I’ve read some comments on Goodreads from fellow readers who believe that To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before should have remained a standalone, and I wholeheartedly agree with that assessment because so much of the plot of P.S. I Still Love You lacked direction and felt hastily put together. For example, there was a lot of discussion of Lara Jean’s father starting to date, but this was never truly explored and no conclusion was reached at the end of the novel. John Ambrose, as a potential love interest for Lara Jean and competition for Peter, felt inserted as an afterthought much too late in the novel, and again, nothing really came of his connection to Lara Jean whatsoever because Lara Jean and Peter end up in exactly the same position at the end of the novel as they are in at the beginning. There are so many side characters that seem to fall by the wayside as well, particularly Margot and Josh, and even the deeper exploration into Genevieve’s character and her personal struggles seems rushed and nonsensical. The plot just felt cobbled together and like a mishmash of ideas that might’ve theoretically been interesting but in execution were not.

I also did not remember Lara Jean being so juvenile, but she came across as extremely childish in P.S. I Still Love You. I truly had trouble believing she was 16 years old, and I don’t see many high school students actually enjoying reading this novel because Lara Jean is too naïve and innocent. I’m not saying that teenagers always need to be depicted as sophisticated or overly mature, but I really got the sense that Lara Jean was modeled more after a middle grader than a high school student, and while her obsession with fashion and cooking was still really cute, it wasn’t enough this time around to fully endear me to her. The same can be said for a character I really liked in To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before but found slightly annoying this time around: Kitty. The novelty of Lara Jean’s 10-year-old sister who acts much wiser than her years wore off completely in this novel, and I found myself kind of rolling my eyes anytime Kitty said something witty or sarcastic. I don’t think she’s fleshed out enough or given enough attention in the plot, and she instead comes across as a random source of one-liners that are meant to make the reader laugh but mostly fall just short of the mark. I really liked the Covey girls in the first book, but this time, I couldn’t warm up to them in the same way, maybe because the plot felt so pointless and made me irritated and frustrated.

Finally, I think one notion that is never fully explored but should be is the idea of how Lara Jean and her sisters grapple on a daily basis with the loss of their mom. There is a profound moment after Lara Jean has had some issues with Peter when she is crying in her room and thinking about how much she misses her mom, but rather than delving deeper into these feelings, the novel flits away from them and Lara Jean goes back to barely thinking about her mother’s death. This doesn’t really make any sense to me, and I think it would be so interesting to have the three sisters properly discuss how losing their mom has impacted their lives, especially in moments of extreme emotion. I don’t see why this isn’t something that’s taken more seriously in the novels because it seems like an excellent opportunity to explore this sort of subject matter within the YA genre.

All in all, I’d say this sequel was a miss for me. I wanted to read it because I know Netflix is making a film adaptation of it, and I found their version of To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before really adorable and a lot of fun. But, to be honest, I don’t know if I’ll end up reading the third book in this trilogy any time soon, if at all. All I have going through my mind right now is Genevieve’s words from the end of the novel: “‘Grow up, Lara Jean.’”

❥❥(out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

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Save the Date ~ #JNGReads

You’re going to want to save a date to read this book all in one sitting – it’s that good!

Save the Date by Morgan Matson got me out of a reading slump I didn’t even know I was in. I’ve read a few good books recently (namely, The Kiss Quotient just before this one), but I wasn’t feeling that unbearable urge to sit down and crack open my book, I wasn’t feeling that heart pounding desire to bust out of work and get home so that I could spend my evening reading. With Save the Date, though, those emotions of excitement and eagerness came rushing back and I found myself thinking about the book even when I was away from it.

Save the Dateis an excellent example of how profound and powerful YA novels can be. My experience of reading it reminded me very much of when I read Before I Fall (a YA book I absolutely loved!) – don’t get me wrong, the subject matter is totally different, but Save the Date, despite it’s lighthearted and funny plot, felt just as meaningful and important as Before I Fall and is a book I would recommend to all YA readers out there.

This novel follows the Grant family, particularly youngest sibling of 5 Charlotte (Charlie) Grant, on the weekend of sister Linnie’s wedding. The story is told from Charlie’s perspective and I fell instantly in love with her – she is wholesome and sweet and somewhat innocent, with a huge heart and this unwavering love for her family and nostalgia for her childhood. Her mother is a famous cartoonist, and intermixed with sections of the story are comics featuring the fictional/illustrated Grant family which mirror what is happening in the plot, and this was an especially nice, heartwarming touch that really made the family feel incredibly real. Each one of the Grant family members, from the father who is a botany professor obsessed with his garden and his feud with one of the neighbours, to Charlie herself, struggling to decide where she wants to go to college, is well fleshed out and so easy to love, and I can honestly say that this was a story where I connected to and enjoyed reading about every single character.

What so many other reviewers have also pointed out is that this particular YA novel is focused on these family relationships, and does not rely too heavily on romance. Yes, there are love interests and crushes for Charlie, but her main source of happiness is having her family all together again during this special weekend, and she spends a lot more time assisting with the wedding and chatting with her siblings than obsessing over her crushes. This was extremely refreshing, and allowed Matson to focus on more profound topics like growing up and what it means to become an adult yourself while still longing to hang onto your connection to your childhood and your family. Charlie struggles with letting go of the past, particularly as her parents prepare to sell their home, and it was so interesting to watch her grapple with the fact that losing a physical space does not at all equate to losing memories and relationships. Like I’ve said, everything about the story was heartwarming and it is kind of impossible not to fall in love with Charlie and her family.

On top of all of this awesomeness, Morgan Matson’s writing style is truly addictive. This book is not short – it’s over 400 pages and the font is pretty tiny! – but it doesn’t feel like a burden to read at all and I found myself flying through it and actually trying to slow down so I wouldn’t finish it all too quickly. I’ve also read Matson’s novel Since You’ve Been Gone and I loved that, so I had a feeling I would really like this one too…but I am so very pleased that Morgan Matson is quickly becoming a YA author I can rely on to deliver an engaging and enjoyable story!

This book should be a John Hughes film…but since it isn’t a movie just yet, GO READ IT!!!

❥❥❥❥❥(out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

The Wicked King ~ #JNGReads

An·ti·cli·mac·tic /ˌan(t)ēˌklīˈmaktik/ (adjective): The Cruel Prince series

Okay, I’m sorry, that was snarky of me, I admit. But honestly, The Wicked King was the very definition of MEH.

Everyone and their best friend is gushing about The Wicked King on Goodreads and Twitter, and I’m just sitting on my couch with the book on my lap, having just finished it, legit confused af.

Am I missing something? Someone please help me because I dearly want to be sucked into this series! Is there something wrong with me? Did I maybe get a faulty copy of the book? Do I also have a faulty copy of The Cruel Prince? Do I need new glasses? WHAT IS THE EXPLANATION FOR THIS?

Nothing happens in The Wicked King. I’m sorry, but it is the least exciting and suspenseful novel I have read in a long time. People were hyping it up as this insane adventure so I was flipping through the pages looking forward to all these twists and turns…and then I realized I was on the LAST PAGE and barely anything had happened! As with The Cruel Prince before it, I felt that The Wicked King spent too long setting the scene for…absolutely nothing to happen! It’s like a book that leads up to…nothing. I can’t even say that I found the ending to be a cliffhanger because at that point, I didn’t care about it whatsoever.

Also, everyone is always ranting and raving about Jude and Cardan and their “chemistry” and again, I’m all like, You mean those characters who spoke to each other all of three times throughout this entire story? Sexual tension? During a handful of sentences spoken to each other? Okay, I must really be missing something! I still can’t figure out if Jude and Cardan actually had sex, so maybe I just wasn’t paying close enough attention or something. *facepalm*

So, anyway, let’s just say that I was underwhelmed by this book. And sure, maybe I’ll read the third book in the series out of curiosity and with this absurd hope that it will be more exciting than the first two…but realistically, I’m not gonna hold my breath.

But, since I generally like to think I’m a nice person, let’s end on a high note, shall we? Here are some quotes from the novel that I actually liked because, after all, it wasn’t all bad!

Quotes I Liked from The Wicked King

“There is only now. There is only tomorrow and tonight and now and soon and never.”

– I admit, I have zero idea what this quote means because if you actually analyze it, it seems like a huge contradiction…but I like how it sounds sooo…

“The Folk doubtlessly learned this lesson long ago. They do not need to deceive humans. Humans will deceive themselves.”

“I have never been so much alone, and I have never had to play a role for this long. I feel hollowed out, diminished.”

“‘I am your creature, Prince Balekin,’ I say, looking into his eyes and lying with my whole broken heart. ‘Do with me what you will. I am yours.’”

❥❥(out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

JNG’s 2018 Reading Round Up

Happy New Year everyone, and thank you for joining me as I round up my reads (the good and the bad) of 2018!

You can find more bookish photos of me and my best friend on our bookstagram, Emerald & Opal!

I have to start by saying that I actually somehow managed to read 75 books this year!!!  I don’t mean to brag, but this is a pretty remarkable feat for me because I only set my Goodreadsgoal at 50 books, and what with starting a new job that has kept me extremely busy and has limited my lunchtime reading, and considering the fact that this was my first year being married and so it included a honeymoon when I didn’t read at all, I don’t know how on Earth I managed to surpass my goal by 50%.  But honestly, I don’t think I’ve ever been prouder of myself because back in university, sure I did a TON of reading and probably read around 75 books a year, but most of those were selected for me by professors and were required course readings. This year, though, I chose all 75 books, carefully curating exactly what I wanted to read and when, and I did write at least a short review (and often a very long one) for every single book.  I would easily call 2018 my most successful reading year ever!!!

With that said, I want to take stock of all the books I read in 2018.  I was originally intending to use the same “awards system” I established in 2017 to detail the best and worst of what I read in specific categories, but my reading turned out to be a bit eclectic and all over the place this year, so I felt like I should simply mention some standouts from various months of the year and explain why I was most connected to or infuriated by each one.  I also should mention that I’ve found in the last few years, and probably particularly in 2018, that my ratings have become incredibly nostalgic and sentimental – somehow, I’ve evolved into this person who, despite having a Master’s in English, can’t seem to rate books based on rigid or strict criteria.  Instead, I always and without fail assign stars to books based on how they make me feel, based on whether or not I get all warm and fuzzy while reading them and based on how many characters touch me profoundly and become friends to me.  Perhaps this isn’t the most consistent or sophisticated way to evaluate books, but I just can’t help it!  Ever since I was a young girl, reading has been an escape for me, and although sometimes school got in the way and made it more of a job, I’ve finally gotten back to a place where I am reading purely to entertain and enjoy.  Reading is, in that way, my life’s greatest salvation…and if that means I give a smutty romance novel or a far-fetched YA fantasy 5 stars every once and awhile because it made me smile on an otherwise trying day, well, that’s just fine by me!

January 2018

  • Stardust by Neil Gaiman – This was (*gasp*) the first Neil Gaiman text I ever read, and it really set the tone for many of my other reading choices in 2018.Without doubt, Neil Gaiman is the author I am most proud to have finally read in 2018, because he really is a genius and can write so many styles and genres, that it just blows my mind!  My husband is also a big fan of Gaiman’s graphic novels, and we ended up watching the recent TV adaptation of American Gods together in like all of one day, so reading Gaiman is something I can bond with my husband about as well, even though he doesn’t read novels and I’m not a huge graphic novel fan.  Definitely was missing out by not having Neil Gaiman in my life prior to this past year!
  • 99 Days by Katie Cotugno – I was not a fan of this book at all, and it was my first real disappointment of 2018. Trust me, unfortunately there would be many more before the year was through.

February 2018

  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid – This book was FABULOUS and was the first book of 2018 that really blew me away! I was sort of astonished by it, particularly because I had read several of Taylor Jenkins Reid’s books prior and was surprised by the change in tone with this book to something a lot more serious.  Huge fan of this read!
  • Snotgirl – Like I said, I’m not a big fan of graphic novels, but for some reason I fell in love this year with Snotgirl. I read the first two volumes this year and just adored the art style, even if the story seemed a bit all over the place.
  • Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez – This is the first book of 2018 that I thought I didn’t give my all to, and it made me wish I were back in school. This is a dense and powerful novel and I knew instantly that I would have to revisit it someday to fully comprehend its beauty.
  • Dating You / Hating You by Christina Lauren – I did not like this book that much and I was super disappointed by my first foray into Christina Lauren’s catalogue…but wait, they would soon do a complete 180 for me, so stay tuned!
  • Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon – I had some seriously complicated feelings toward this book because it was so easy and quick to read but struck me as very offensive.I still have yet to watch the film adaptation because I was just so over the story after reading it!

March 2018

  • Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman – Gaiman strikes again! I should mention that this is probably my favourite Neil Gaiman book I’ve read to date.

April 2018

  • Summer at Tiffany’s by Karen Swan – I finally picked up the sequel to Christmas at Tiffany’s, a favourite of mine, and adored it! I would go on to read many more Karen Swan books in 2018…and unfortunately, towards the end of the year, she did a 180 for me but in the opposite direction of Christina Lauren…
  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman – I am officially obsessed with him!

May 2018

  • A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas – Talk about reading as an escape…here, I got the chance to revisit some of my best book friends, and despite how short the novel was, I loved every single moment of it.
  • A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray – This was another huge disappointment of 2018. I had this book on my To-Read List for years, and when I finally got around to reading it, I was like Waaah?!?!  Very upset about this one!
  • Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas – And thus began my journey into the world of Aelin…… I did take a brief break halfway through reading the series, but truly, this series shook me and has without doubt been the highlight of my 2018 reading journey!

June 2018

  • Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson – I read two books with this exact same title in 2018.This was the first and I loved it and am looking forward to reading more of Matson’s books very soon!

July 2018

  • Beautiful by Christina Lauren – And here it is, the first 180 of 2018: after being unenthused by Dating You / Hating You, I picked Beautiful up super cheap at the bookstore and blew through it. It made me feel warm and so happy, and was a definite favourite of the summer months!
  • Just One Day by Gayle Forman – Another major disappointment and one that I had on my To-Read List for so long too. I still have no idea what all the hype is about – and believe me, I wish I did!
  • The Greek Escape by Karen Swan – Loved this one, although not as much as Summer at Tiffany’s

August 2018

  • Since You’ve Been Gone by Anouska Knight – Book #2 with this title and I thoroughly enjoyed it as well!
  • Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman – I’m reading this book out loud to my husband and we still haven’t finished it, but it is extremely well written and is another testament to how incredible Gaiman’s talent is!

September 2018

  • Empire of Storms by Sarah J. Maas – This book broke me and the review I wrote of it is my favourite review I have ever written (and possibly one of the shortest too)!

October 2018

  • A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara – This book also broke me, and although a lot of readers have called it torture porn, I really liked it and found it very moving.I don’t regret reading this one whatsoever.
  • Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas – I still can’t talk about this one. I just…can’t.

November 2018

  • Roar by Cecelia Ahern – This was the worst book I read in 2018. I hate to be mean, but it was just way too simplistic and on the nose and cliché.  I was vehemently not a fan of this!
  • The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – But then again, I really wasn’t a fan of this one either. It was my first try at reading a Morton novel and I regret that I didn’t pick up one of her other books because I’ve noticed that a lot of her fans were confused by this one.  It truly was all over the place.

December 2018

  • The Christmas Secret by Karen Swan – 2018’s second 180 came when I struggled with this novel, even though it was written by an author I adore. But, I guess we can’t always love everything someone writes (unless they’re Neil Gaiman apparently)!
  • Jane by Aline Brosh McKenna & Ramón K. Pérez – I ended 2018 by reading a graphic novel adaptation of my favourite book of all time, Jane Eyreby Charlotte Brontë. And while it didn’t wow me, I was happy to return to some old friends at the end of a long year.

So that’s about it from me.  If you chose to stick around and read this entire round up, thank you so very much!!!

Now, I better get back to my first book of 2019…no time to lose!

xo

Janille N G

Girl with a Green Heart

A Soothing Balm to Remedy Another Mediocre Reading Experience ~ #JNGReads

Just a quick update on this Sunday night!

I recently finished two novels.  The first, The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton, I found to be very disappointing, dry and confusing.  For that reason, I decided to move right into re-reading an absolute favourite novel of mine, A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas, which, needless to say, took my heart in its clutches yet again.  Short reviews for both of these novels are below, if you’re at all interested.

Thank you for reading, as always! xo

The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton

Oh dear.

I really wanted to like this book because I’ve been hearing about Kate Morton for so long and truly expected to be touched by her work. But, I had a lot of trouble following the threads of this story, and while certain chapters were interesting and touched me (such as the ones about Elodie in the beginning and those devoted to Juliet and her young children), I just didn’t ever feel that engrossed in the plot and I found my mind wandering on several occasions. Sadly, I think this story was just too disjointed, and the things that were promised, like romance and suspense, were sorely lacking. There also was no real sense of resolution, particularly with characters like Elodie and Jack, and I found myself confused as to the point of all of the characters. This story didn’t need to be as complex as it was and probably would have been easier to follow, better written and more enjoyable if characters like Elodie, Jack, Lauren, Ada, Leonard, Juliet and Tip were excluded (not to mention unnecessary side characters like Pippa, Alastair and Penelope). Basically, I wonder why, if this book is called The Clockmaker’s Daughter, it didn’t simply stick to her storyline and call it a day?!

Pretty disappointed with this one, unfortunately!

❥❥ (out of 5)

 

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

(Reading for the second time.)

Somehow, I thought that re-reading this novel, knowing what would happen, might make it a little easier…and yet, I feel like I could throw up right now at the end of it.

Somehow, knowing what Rhys is to Feyre from the beginning made their courtship, his evident uncertainty and longing throughout, that much more agonizing and heart-wrenching.  Somehow, remembering what would occur in the final chapters, how their bond would be severed (even if not truly), made me at once anxious and terrified to get to the end. Somehow, getting to spend more wonderful time with characters I have grown to love and think about almost every single day since encountering them for the first time made saying goodbye to them again, just moments, ago that much harder.

Re-reading a favourite book isn’t always easy, I guess…but somehow, sometimes, it just feels necessary.  It feels like coming home after a long day to a couch by a fireplace, in a townhouse surrounded by snow and night, and sitting curled up beside a dear old friend.

This novel touched my heart last year when I read it for the first time, and as my heart ached last weekend, I knew it was the one balm I needed to revisit.  For that, it will always get infinite stars (oh, how fitting!), from me.

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

Saying Goodbye ~ #JNGReads Kingdom of Ash

◆MINOR SPOILERS AHEAD!!! ◆

The fact that there is a brief cameo by Rhysand in Kingdom of Ash is all that needs to be mentioned to hint at how I felt about this book.  It was utter perfection!

I’ve spent the better part of this year with the Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas.  I started the first book right after coming home from my honeymoon in May, and I moved swiftly through the majority of the series before taking a tiny break and then finishing the rest of it.  Suffice it to say that many of the months of 2018 have been spent thinking about Celaena/Aelin and her court members and friends…and I can’t say I’m upset about that!

If you happened to read my review of The Assassin’s Blade (the prequel to the Throne of Glass series), you’ll know that I had a bit of a rough start with this story.  Unlike the A Court of Thorns and Roses series, which wowed me right from the first book and had me totally hooked, my experience with ToG was a bit more tumultuous in that I didn’t love the characters from the very beginning and found my mind wandering as I read many of the early books.  When I made my way to Heir of Fire, though, I started to become more intrigued, and then by the time I finished Empire of Storms…holy ****, I was shattered.  That book really clinched the series for me, and reading The Assassin’s Blade and then Tower of Dawn right after made me extremely fond of the characters, particularly of Aelin who does this complete 180 from how she was in the first few books – something that I personally appreciated!

What makes this series so special?  I don’t think I’m an authority on that, to be honest.  I read the entire series in one year, and while that made my experience very immersive and emotional, there are readers out there who began reading the series as soon as it came out six years ago.  That is A LOT of time to spend with such fictional friends, and I can’t imagine how much more devastated I would’ve been at the conclusion of this series if I had been reading it for so long because…to be honest…I’m devastated that it’s over even now.  I spent all of last year reading the ACOTAR series, but then, I had ToG to look forward to.  Now, I have nothing…well, at least until Sarah J. Maas releases her next novel!

Again, I’m no expert on this series, but it is one that I have seriously enjoyed and that I am thrilled to have read!  I’m a true and loyal fan of Aelin and her court now (Does my outfit for today – see below – make that clear enough?) and I do feel like I learned a lot from Aelin’s character about inner strength and fortitude and the lengths someone sometimes has to go to in order to protect the ones they love.  My reading life will be a little bit emptier now for having lost Aelin, but my own personality has certainly benefited from this lesson in perseverance and sacrifice.

I could go on and on, quoting scenes from Kingdom of Ash that I loved – I bookmarked almost every other page because it had a scene or passage that I liked – but what would be the point of that?  That would spoil it for you readers out there who are lucky enough to get to read it for the first time, and for those of you who have read it, I’m sure you already have your favourite passages anyway!  My one piece of advice to readers just starting Kingdom of Ash would be to take it slooow.  I spent over two weeks reading this novel, even though a book as big as 980 pages would normally only take me just over a week. But, I wanted to savour every moment, every sentence, and really soak it all in, and I am very happy that I chose to do that, because I am now left with a profound sense of having truly lived with these characters and said a thorough and proper goodbye to them.

ToG was an incredible ride and one that will make my 2018 reading year hard to top and even harder to forget!

❥❥❥❥❥ (out of 5)

All hail the Queen of Terrasen!

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

Yours Truly ~ #JNGReads

I have to be totally honest and realistic here…I don’t think I’m going to be posting a book review for a while.

The reason for that is not at all that I’m going to be taking a step back from reading – quite the contrary, I am actually going to be reading a 980-page novel. That’s right, as soon as it came out on October 23rd, I leapt right into the world of Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas, the final installment in the Throne of Glass series.  Now, a nearly 1,000-page book would not necessarily take me that long to finish (especially because I usually try to read 100 pages per day), but with this one in particular, I want to take my time and revel in every moment spent with this book.  Although I had a nonchalant attitude toward the first few books in the Throne of Glass series, by Empire of Storms, I was hooked and I have been looking forward to Kingdom of Ash for months now.  So why rush it?  I certainly see no reason to, and so I’ll probably be a bit MIA on the blog for some time.  But, rest assured, I will definitely have lots of thoughts about Kingdom of Ash once I’m finished.

And, in the meantime, here’s a teeny tiny review of a book I finished earlier this week to tide you all over…

Yours Truly by Kirsty Greenwood

This novel should be a Hallmark movie.

It’s sugary sweet and adorable, and the narrator Natalie is an absolute riot. I thoroughly enjoyed this read, and although it wasn’t the best book I’ve ever read (or even the best chick lit. novel), it was definitely a great diversion.

I would definitely recommend it to fans of Sophie Kinsella, Sally Thorne, Gemma Townley and all those other writers of great, quirky romances!

❥❥❥(out of 5)

Thank you, as always, for stopping by!

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

JNG’s Weekly Round-Up ~ What I’ve Read and Been Up to Recently

Hello and Happy Sunday, dear Readers! My apologies for not having a Weekly Round-Up for you last week.  I had every intention of posting a review for the book I finished two weeks ago last weekend, but I must admit, … Continue reading

JNG’s Weekly Round-Up ~ What I Read This Week

Happy Sunday, dear Readers!

I managed to finish two short novels this week. I wrote short reviews of both of them on Goodreads, but thought it would be a good idea to also post them here on the blog.

Top Ten by Katie Cotugno

I liked this book in spite of myself.

In spite of Gabby being snarky about 90% of the time.

In spite of the overuse of the words “dude” and “intellectually”.

In spite of the fact that there is a bisexual female lead character (finally!) who doesn’t get a single chance to express to the reader why or how she arrived at these feelings and this awesome sense of self-acceptance, even though that sort of storyline would have been 10 times more fascinating than the cliché 80’s movie one we got.

In spite of the constant fighting and immature bickering of the two best friends/pseudo-lovers.

In spite of a portrayal of anxiety that felt (to this reader who suffers from anxiety) to be oversimplified and that focused too much on Gabby blaming and hating herself for having a mental illness, rather than accepting it and choosing to love and take care of herself. And in spite of the use of the word “panicker” in place of “panic attack” (ew!).

In spite of the jarring timeline.

In spite of the strangely first person-esque third person narration.

And finally, in spite of my eventual realization, in the end, that nothing really happened at all and that the characters didn’t grow one bit.

❥❥❥ (out of 5)

 

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn

Sharp Objects is:
Addictive | Thrilling | Unsettling | Upsetting | Traumatic | Chilling | Haunting | Gross | Emotional | Visceral | Grotesque | Disgusting | Sticky | Suffocating | Messy | Messed Up | Frightening | Fascinating | Terrifying

Many of these words might be written on main character Camille Preaker’s skin. Or, I should say more accurately, carved into. That image in itself portrays how graphic Sharp Objects is, and how much of the novel is truly felt by the reader, almost physically. Sharp Objects, but more particularly Camille Preaker’s narration, got under my skin and made me queasy and tingly, and I think the true power and profundity of Sharp Objects is not in its plot (which is quite a run of the mill murder mystery) but instead in its telling, in its characters and their flawed psychologies, in Camille’s unvarnished speech and honesty. Reading Sharp Objects felt like being confided in, even as so much of me wanted to run from the secrets and inner thoughts that were being revealed.
❥❥❥ (out of 5)

Have a lovely day and week ahead! xo

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

The Assassin’s Blade ~ #JNGReads the Throne of Glass Series

Check out the bookstagram page I share with my best friend, Emerald & Opal, to see more photos like this!

I feel like it’s time to finally put some thoughts on paper about a series that has recently taken my life by storm: the Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas. I recently finished reading the novella collection The Assassin’s Blade, which serves as a prequel to the series itself, and just before that, I finished Empire of Storms, which pretty much destroyed me. The only current novel in the series that I have left to finish is Tower of Dawn…that is, until the new novel is released in October. Considering that I am just about caught up in the series, I figured it was about time for me to say a few things about the series, through the lens of having just finished a prequel that made me think a lot about my journey with these characters.

Having said all of this, there may be some minor spoilers ahead for the entire Throne of Glass series, so please bear that in mind.

Probably the single most impressive thing, in my opinion, about the Throne of Glass series is the development of the characters and their relationships with one another. This is what has led me to write this review after reading The Assassin’s Blade because so much of that collection brings to the forefront just how far the characters have come by the time we reach Empire of Storms. In The Assassin’s Blade, we see Celaena Sardothien in a way that, having come as far as Empire of Storms, we haven’t seen her for some time. She is back to being Adarlan’s Assassin, an overly confident sassy-pants who is obsessed with refinement, comfort and her physical appearance. She comes across as a bit vapid, I’ll be honest, but there is also evidently some fight in her and a great deal of strength. She isn’t exactly likable though, and in many ways she’s the true opposite to someone like Feyre of Maas’ A Court of Thorns and Roses in that Celaena is a bit…well…spoiled.

Reading about this version of Celaena (believe me, there are many “versions” of this character) reminded me of my initial reaction to Throne of Glass which, to be honest, wasn’t a novel I loved. Although the series certainly picked up for me, it wasn’t until I hit Heir of Fire and Queen of Shadows that I started to feel any affection for Celaena…and at that point, she had already become an entirely different character and reassumed her rightful identity as Aelin Ashryver Galathynius, Queen of Terrasen. I’ve noticed that Maas tends to like to do this with her characters, forcing them to make a total 180 shift, and Celaena certainly does that when she embraces the fact that she is the lost queen of Terrasen and accepts the responsibility associated with that. Aelin is similar to Celaena in some ways – she is fierce, cunning and skilled – but she is also so very different in that she is truly selfless. That much is clear by the (devastating!!!) end of Empire of Storms, and this transformation gave me not only a respect for Maas’ writing and creativity, but also for Aelin as a character. She has quickly become one of my favourite fictional heroines.

But how do we, as readers, reconcile the Aelin we know (and, in my case, love) by the end of Empire of Storms with the Celaena we found to be a bit of a mean girl in Throne of Glass and The Assassin’s Blade? Well, I think this is where the true power of the Throne of Glass series as a whole becomes clear. The series is the story of both Aelin Galathynius and Celaena Sardothien, and it is important to remember that these women are the same person. Who can say, though, that they have not changed at all over the years? Isn’t it normal for a person to grow and develop, especially in the face of trauma and adversity? So, why should Aelin/Celaena not undergo this same process – and why should older, wiser Aelin be judged for the actions and attitude of younger, less world-weary Celaena?

It was remarkable, to me, to see Celaena all over again in The Assassin’s Blade after journeying so far with Aelin. It really made me reconsider Celaena’s entire personality because I was much more sympathetic toward her while reading The Assassin’s Blade than I was when I first encountered her in Throne of Glass. That’s surely due to the gift of hindsight, but knowing what Aelin would go through in Empire of Storms, the sacrifices she would be forced to make by the end, I felt so sad for Celaena because I knew what was ahead in her future, from the salt mines of Endovier, to horrible battles against grotesque enemies, to…an iron mask and iron chains and an iron box that I’m still not even close to ready to talk about. Of course, Aelin also finds a lot of love (and heartache too) along the way, and it is glorifying to remember that she will eventually meet Rowan and share some beautiful moments with him…but everything is tinged with a bit of unease and melancholy, in the full knowledge that Celaena Sardothien, who puts so much time into her outfits and her hair and her nails, will very soon reach a point where none of that will matter even remotely.

Maas is a master of creating characters that stick with you. She made me, the reader who has never picked up Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings, into a fantasy lover just by creating heroines that touched me so profoundly and made me care. Aelin is one of those heroines, no doubt, and I’ve found myself thinking of her nonstop, especially after finishing Empire of Storms, which literally haunts me. I assume that Maas’ intention in releasing The Assassin’s Blade was to make her readers reconsider Celaena from a whole new perspective, and to me, she achieved the mark and then some. I was heartbroken for future Aelin, but still uplifted for former Celaena, knowing that she would become this fearsome and fascinating and awe-inspiring woman to behold. That ride, that journey of watching a woman come into her own, was remarkable.

And, perhaps I’m over-reading things and wearing my English MA glasses for this one…but were there an absurd number of references to iron chains and doors in The Assassin’s Blade?! That cannot be coincidence, can it? Not cool, Sarah J. Maas, not cool!

Song Recommendation:

I feel this song accurately represents Aelin’s journey as a character…and so I’ve been listening to it non-stop – haha!

*College & Electric Youth – A Real Hero*

 

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart