The Dinner List ~ #JNGReads

“A change of plans, a subway reroute, a rainstorm in the forecast for a summer picnic.”

The Dinner List by Rebecca Serle was not at all what I expected…and I mean that in the best possible way.

I’ve had this novel on my To-Read List for a very long time now, after spotting it in Indigo, being drawn in by the bright yellow cover (apparently this is a colour that really works for books, because I’ve read a ton of yellow books recently!) and the cute caricature of Audrey Hepburn on it. Of course, like most women (and probably men too) out there, I’m an Audrey Hepburn fan, and so I just had to read the synopsis for this book. The premise, that a woman named Sabrina has a birthday dinner with the five people, both living and dead, who have had a profound impact on her life, seemed really intriguing and unique to me, and I instantly put it on my Goodreads list to read in the future. For some reason, I don’t remember what, I didn’t pick up the book that day, and I actually didn’t buy it until 4 days ago.

I am so glad that I did because this book is not at all what you would expect from reading the blurb in the inside cover. I was expecting a run of the mill chick lit. novel about how Sabrina is having trouble getting over he ex-boyfriend and uses this dinner to evaluate her feelings for him and rekindle their romance. Instead, The Dinner List is so much deeper. It is a story that, yes, investigates Sabrina’s relationship with Tobias by alternating between narration of the dinner and an exploration of their 10 years together. However, The Dinner List goes beyond this seemingly cliché plot to delve into notions of loss and regret. Sabrina’s story becomes about much more than her romantic relationship as she is forced to come to terms with her feelings toward a father who abandoned her at a young age, as well as toward her best friend who has moved on to an entirely new life of marriage and motherhood that Sabrina feels both jealous of and unable to come to terms with. Sabrina must evaluate all of her relationships, all of the connections that have made her into the woman she is, to ultimately determine the kind of life and love she wants moving forward. She must wrestle with her devotion to fate and actually poke and prod at relationships she has otherwise taken for granted and been reluctant to think critically about, namely her love story with Tobias.

There is, also, a twist in this story, which I will not mention (it would ruin everything if I did) and which utterly crushed me. When my husband turned from the TV and looked at me curled up on the couch beside him, my head buried in this book and tears streaming down my face, he knew it was going to be a novel I would rave about when I was done. And it’s true, I am a really big fan of books that are full of strong emotions. The Dinner List was not a novel I was expecting to be profound and moving and touching, but it really was, and I cried about 3 more times after this initial incident, thinking about how easy it is to take life and love for granted and how dangerous that can be. I can’t say I felt satisfied by the ending, but that’s mainly because I wanted to know more about how Sabrina would proceed and what she would do next – I craved more from the ending, which is a sure sign that the story was a good and incredibly engrossing one!

What was most exciting to me about The Dinner List, though, is that it introduced me to a new writer in Rebecca Serle that I am very eager to follow. Serle’s writing style really spoke to me, and I loved the way she structured her narrative, weaving past and present effortlessly. I also loved her manner of writing dialogue because it was so easy to read, so fluid, and it honestly felt as though I was sitting at the dinner table with Sabrina and her guests. It can sometimes be hard to read scenes that are mostly conversation between characters, especially if the dialogue feels forced, fake and constructed, but I didn’t feel this way at all about The Dinner List, and I instead felt very much like I was sucked into the evening as if I were a participant myself. Serle also has a knack for writing about emotions in a way that is not over the top or silly, but is perfectly indicative, in my opinion, of how twenty- and thirty-something people feel about love and friendship nowadays. Her take on relationships felt very modern to me, and even her descriptions of Sabrina’s struggles with work and money felt realistic and human. I seriously have the impression that Serle is a great, young voice in contemporary literature, and I am eager to pick up some of her young adult novels and watch out for any adult fiction she writes in the future.

“Here is what I remember him saying: Kindness before honesty.

We are taught that honesty is the most important quality. Tell the truth. Do not lie. Etc. But there are so many instances when honest isn’t kind. When the kinder thing to do is to keep what you have to say to yourself.”

All in all, The Dinner List was a hit with me and I’m going to pass it along to my mom straightaway…which means it is a really good one! I’m so glad that I finally had the chance to pick this one up!

❥❥❥❥❥(out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

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The Wicked King ~ #JNGReads

An·ti·cli·mac·tic /ˌan(t)ēˌklīˈmaktik/ (adjective): The Cruel Prince series

Okay, I’m sorry, that was snarky of me, I admit. But honestly, The Wicked King was the very definition of MEH.

Everyone and their best friend is gushing about The Wicked King on Goodreads and Twitter, and I’m just sitting on my couch with the book on my lap, having just finished it, legit confused af.

Am I missing something? Someone please help me because I dearly want to be sucked into this series! Is there something wrong with me? Did I maybe get a faulty copy of the book? Do I also have a faulty copy of The Cruel Prince? Do I need new glasses? WHAT IS THE EXPLANATION FOR THIS?

Nothing happens in The Wicked King. I’m sorry, but it is the least exciting and suspenseful novel I have read in a long time. People were hyping it up as this insane adventure so I was flipping through the pages looking forward to all these twists and turns…and then I realized I was on the LAST PAGE and barely anything had happened! As with The Cruel Prince before it, I felt that The Wicked King spent too long setting the scene for…absolutely nothing to happen! It’s like a book that leads up to…nothing. I can’t even say that I found the ending to be a cliffhanger because at that point, I didn’t care about it whatsoever.

Also, everyone is always ranting and raving about Jude and Cardan and their “chemistry” and again, I’m all like, You mean those characters who spoke to each other all of three times throughout this entire story? Sexual tension? During a handful of sentences spoken to each other? Okay, I must really be missing something! I still can’t figure out if Jude and Cardan actually had sex, so maybe I just wasn’t paying close enough attention or something. *facepalm*

So, anyway, let’s just say that I was underwhelmed by this book. And sure, maybe I’ll read the third book in the series out of curiosity and with this absurd hope that it will be more exciting than the first two…but realistically, I’m not gonna hold my breath.

But, since I generally like to think I’m a nice person, let’s end on a high note, shall we? Here are some quotes from the novel that I actually liked because, after all, it wasn’t all bad!

Quotes I Liked from The Wicked King

“There is only now. There is only tomorrow and tonight and now and soon and never.”

– I admit, I have zero idea what this quote means because if you actually analyze it, it seems like a huge contradiction…but I like how it sounds sooo…

“The Folk doubtlessly learned this lesson long ago. They do not need to deceive humans. Humans will deceive themselves.”

“I have never been so much alone, and I have never had to play a role for this long. I feel hollowed out, diminished.”

“‘I am your creature, Prince Balekin,’ I say, looking into his eyes and lying with my whole broken heart. ‘Do with me what you will. I am yours.’”

❥❥(out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

100 Percent Yours ~ #JNGReads Sally Thorne’s 99 Percent Mine

Sally Thorne, I’m 100% yours.

Before writing this review, I went back and read over my very first review of The Hating Game. I say my very first review because I have since re-read The Hating Game and mentioned it about 2.5 billion times on my blog and in reviews of other books. And I haven’t just gushed about The Hating Game in reviews of other romance novels – The Hating Game was my absolute favourite book of 2017, surpassing books like A Court of Mist and Fury and Six of Crows, as well as favourite short story collections of mine and even two adaptations of my favourite novel Jane Eyre. The Hating Game literally took my breath away (like actually, I think I stopped breathing a few times in my local Starbucks) and it was impossible for me to 1) put down, and 2) stop thinking about. It stayed with me for a year after my first read of it, until I read it again, and it is without doubt one of my favourite books of all-time, one that I can rely on in an instant to cheer me up and make me feel warm and cozy.

“And this little chick lit. book, this story that was supposed to be so fun and light, is about to make me cry. It all comes down to this: The Hating Game is all about chemistry, that zing between two people who are unbearably attracted to each other, but who also want to curl up into each other, hold each other tight. The very definition of lovers…a word that does, of course, involve love.

This book is making me tingle and I don’t want it to end. It is keeping me warm during a cold and barren week. It is reminding me of the chemistry I have with my special person and also of the spark I want to keep in my life forever. I seriously never want this book to end!”

– from my review of The Hating Game

So, let’s just say that Sally Thorne had a lot to live up to in my estimation with 99 Percent Mine. And, I have to be honest, I was very nervous when I picked up the cheery, bright yellow book and flipped to the first page. There was no way in my mind that it could live up to how astonishingly amazing The Hating Game was – and to be fair, it didn’t. I don’t think 99 Percent Mine touched me quite as profoundly as The Hating Game did, but that could very well be down to nostalgia and the fact that I have lived longer with The Hating Game in my life and have had time to dwell on it and keep it warmly cradled in my heart. What is clear is that 99 Percent Mine is an excellent book (even if I didn’t quite love Darcy and Tom as much as my OG faves Lucy and Josh), and Sally Thorne is a compelling, unique and clearly extremely talented voice in romantic literature.

I don’t want to spoil too much about 99 Percent Mine by going on and on about what happens or talking about specific scenes. The plot isn’t even that crazy or anything, so there wouldn’t be too much to say. What makes 99 Percent Mine special (and indeed, what made The Hating Game special before it) is how Sally Thorne writes, not what she writes. Her ability to play with words and string them together in ways that are new and interesting never ceases to amaze me, and while I was concerned that she wouldn’t be able to keep up her style in a second novel, I was blown away by the fact that Thorne’s signature take on language and writing is still present, but the voice of the narrator Darcy still sounds so distinct from that of Lucy in The Hating Game. Even though the reader is well aware that Sally Thorne is the author because of how unique the overall style is, it is still very much evident that the narrator’s voice is different and that Darcy is someone totally unlike Lucy. The dialogue still sizzles like it did in The Hating Game, but there is more of an overt fire here than a slow simmer, and Darcy is much more bold and feisty than her counterpart Lucy. Tom, on the other hand, is shy and soft in ways that Joshua Templeman never was, and this contrast shows great diversity in Thorne’s range as well as great creativity!

It’s so hard to put into words why Sally Thorne’s writing is just so good, so the best approach is probably for me to leave you with some of my favourite passages directly from the novel, so that her words can speak for themselves. Before I do that, though, let me just say that Sally Thorne is without doubt my favourite chick lit. writer, and that is saying a lot because I have been loyal to Sophie Kinsella and Gemma Townley and Karen Swan and Emma Chase (to name a few) for a long time. But Sally Thorne has a voice that is so truly her own and it is impossible to ignore and not get drawn in by it, and for that reason, I will read absolutely anything she writes, probably for the rest of my life!

My Favourite Passages from 99 Percent Mine

“I walk along slowly and drag my fingertips along the bars of chocolate. Goddamn, you sexy little squares. Dark, milk, white, I do not discriminate. I eat it all. Those fluorescent sour candies that only obnoxious little boys like. I suck candy apples clean. If an envelope is sweet, I’ll lick it twice.”

“He still never gives me more than a one-second look before blinking away. But that’s okay. One second always feels like a long time when I’m with him.”

“I want to walk two steps in front of him, wherever he goes, bulldozing the world a little flatter for him.”

“I want to know what his goddamn bones smell like. Let me start down in his DNA structure and work my way back out.”

“Unzip me, climb into me, don’t come out.”

(Also, as a small aside, let me just say that the bonus epilogue from The Hating Game that was included in my edition of 99 Percent Mine made my heart feel are warm and fuzzy and grow about 10 sizes…and it’s the dead of winter here in Toronto with over 25cm of snow on the ground…so that’s certainly saying something!)

❥❥❥❥❥(out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

Love at First Sight ~ #JNGReads The Royal Runaway

“We weren’t midday or midnight. We were dawn, dusk, and midsummer. Caught in the middle of time and space, ever so fleeting. Blink and you’d never see us – the runaway princess and the dead spy.”

Picture this: I’m striding through Indigo with my husband last Saturday. I’ve just bought 2 new books the day before, so for once, I’m not in here to pick up any literature; instead, I’ve come to take a look at the various home accessories.

All of a sudden, walking past a table stacked with paperbacks, I gasp quietly.

“Damn,” I mutter.

“What is it?” my husband turns around to see me gazing at one book in particular.

“This book,” I say, holding it up for him to see. “I think I have to buy it.”

“Another one?” he asks, concerned.

“Another one,” I reply.

***********

Now, in my defense, how was I going to resist a book with a cover like this one?

If there’s one thing my husband knows about me, it’s that I am a total sucker for anything royal or romance. Combine the two, and I’m an absolute goner. It wouldn’t have mattered if I had bought 2 million books the day before instead of just 2, I would’ve needed to add this one to my collection.

And boy, am I glad I did! The Royal Runaway by Lindsay Emory is adorable, sweet and suspenseful. A quote on the back cover says that it’s a cross between The Princess Diaries and James Bond, and that description couldn’t be more accurate. Since princesses and British spies happen to be two of my favourite things on the planet (Casino Royale is, to be frank, my favourite move of all time), there was no way I wasn’t going to enjoy this spicy chick lit. story.

I will admit, the plot was a bit muddled at times, and I didn’t think there was any Wow! moment of revelation. The story didn’t have many cliffhangers and I wasn’t quite on the edge of my seat, but the pacing was fast and engaging, and I was thoroughly entertained throughout my reading journey.

What was more wonderful than the plot, though, was the voice of the main character and narrator, Princess Thea! This was probably my favourite aspect of the novel and what made it stand out to me: Thea’s narration is full of sass and wit, and she comes out of nowhere with these hilarious one liners and sarcastic comments that made it very easy to like her. Although she’s royal by blood, she’s incredibly down-to-earth and very girl next door, and she was easily the type of character I could see myself becoming good friends with in real-life. Her relationship with Nick is certainly compelling and there’s lots of tension there, but it was really Thea’s own internal monologue that kept me reading and brought me back to the book at the end of a long day.

This is definitely your quintessential contemporary romance, and if you’re a fan of books by Meg Cabot and Sophie Kinsella or stories like The Hating Game by Sally Thorne, I have no doubt that you’ll love this one! I look forward to reading more of Emory’s books and adding her to my list of go-to chick lit. writers!

❥❥❥.5 (out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

JNG’s 2018 Reading Round Up

Happy New Year everyone, and thank you for joining me as I round up my reads (the good and the bad) of 2018!

You can find more bookish photos of me and my best friend on our bookstagram, Emerald & Opal!

I have to start by saying that I actually somehow managed to read 75 books this year!!!  I don’t mean to brag, but this is a pretty remarkable feat for me because I only set my Goodreadsgoal at 50 books, and what with starting a new job that has kept me extremely busy and has limited my lunchtime reading, and considering the fact that this was my first year being married and so it included a honeymoon when I didn’t read at all, I don’t know how on Earth I managed to surpass my goal by 50%.  But honestly, I don’t think I’ve ever been prouder of myself because back in university, sure I did a TON of reading and probably read around 75 books a year, but most of those were selected for me by professors and were required course readings. This year, though, I chose all 75 books, carefully curating exactly what I wanted to read and when, and I did write at least a short review (and often a very long one) for every single book.  I would easily call 2018 my most successful reading year ever!!!

With that said, I want to take stock of all the books I read in 2018.  I was originally intending to use the same “awards system” I established in 2017 to detail the best and worst of what I read in specific categories, but my reading turned out to be a bit eclectic and all over the place this year, so I felt like I should simply mention some standouts from various months of the year and explain why I was most connected to or infuriated by each one.  I also should mention that I’ve found in the last few years, and probably particularly in 2018, that my ratings have become incredibly nostalgic and sentimental – somehow, I’ve evolved into this person who, despite having a Master’s in English, can’t seem to rate books based on rigid or strict criteria.  Instead, I always and without fail assign stars to books based on how they make me feel, based on whether or not I get all warm and fuzzy while reading them and based on how many characters touch me profoundly and become friends to me.  Perhaps this isn’t the most consistent or sophisticated way to evaluate books, but I just can’t help it!  Ever since I was a young girl, reading has been an escape for me, and although sometimes school got in the way and made it more of a job, I’ve finally gotten back to a place where I am reading purely to entertain and enjoy.  Reading is, in that way, my life’s greatest salvation…and if that means I give a smutty romance novel or a far-fetched YA fantasy 5 stars every once and awhile because it made me smile on an otherwise trying day, well, that’s just fine by me!

January 2018

  • Stardust by Neil Gaiman – This was (*gasp*) the first Neil Gaiman text I ever read, and it really set the tone for many of my other reading choices in 2018.Without doubt, Neil Gaiman is the author I am most proud to have finally read in 2018, because he really is a genius and can write so many styles and genres, that it just blows my mind!  My husband is also a big fan of Gaiman’s graphic novels, and we ended up watching the recent TV adaptation of American Gods together in like all of one day, so reading Gaiman is something I can bond with my husband about as well, even though he doesn’t read novels and I’m not a huge graphic novel fan.  Definitely was missing out by not having Neil Gaiman in my life prior to this past year!
  • 99 Days by Katie Cotugno – I was not a fan of this book at all, and it was my first real disappointment of 2018. Trust me, unfortunately there would be many more before the year was through.

February 2018

  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid – This book was FABULOUS and was the first book of 2018 that really blew me away! I was sort of astonished by it, particularly because I had read several of Taylor Jenkins Reid’s books prior and was surprised by the change in tone with this book to something a lot more serious.  Huge fan of this read!
  • Snotgirl – Like I said, I’m not a big fan of graphic novels, but for some reason I fell in love this year with Snotgirl. I read the first two volumes this year and just adored the art style, even if the story seemed a bit all over the place.
  • Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez – This is the first book of 2018 that I thought I didn’t give my all to, and it made me wish I were back in school. This is a dense and powerful novel and I knew instantly that I would have to revisit it someday to fully comprehend its beauty.
  • Dating You / Hating You by Christina Lauren – I did not like this book that much and I was super disappointed by my first foray into Christina Lauren’s catalogue…but wait, they would soon do a complete 180 for me, so stay tuned!
  • Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon – I had some seriously complicated feelings toward this book because it was so easy and quick to read but struck me as very offensive.I still have yet to watch the film adaptation because I was just so over the story after reading it!

March 2018

  • Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman – Gaiman strikes again! I should mention that this is probably my favourite Neil Gaiman book I’ve read to date.

April 2018

  • Summer at Tiffany’s by Karen Swan – I finally picked up the sequel to Christmas at Tiffany’s, a favourite of mine, and adored it! I would go on to read many more Karen Swan books in 2018…and unfortunately, towards the end of the year, she did a 180 for me but in the opposite direction of Christina Lauren…
  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman – I am officially obsessed with him!

May 2018

  • A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas – Talk about reading as an escape…here, I got the chance to revisit some of my best book friends, and despite how short the novel was, I loved every single moment of it.
  • A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray – This was another huge disappointment of 2018. I had this book on my To-Read List for years, and when I finally got around to reading it, I was like Waaah?!?!  Very upset about this one!
  • Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas – And thus began my journey into the world of Aelin…… I did take a brief break halfway through reading the series, but truly, this series shook me and has without doubt been the highlight of my 2018 reading journey!

June 2018

  • Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson – I read two books with this exact same title in 2018.This was the first and I loved it and am looking forward to reading more of Matson’s books very soon!

July 2018

  • Beautiful by Christina Lauren – And here it is, the first 180 of 2018: after being unenthused by Dating You / Hating You, I picked Beautiful up super cheap at the bookstore and blew through it. It made me feel warm and so happy, and was a definite favourite of the summer months!
  • Just One Day by Gayle Forman – Another major disappointment and one that I had on my To-Read List for so long too. I still have no idea what all the hype is about – and believe me, I wish I did!
  • The Greek Escape by Karen Swan – Loved this one, although not as much as Summer at Tiffany’s

August 2018

  • Since You’ve Been Gone by Anouska Knight – Book #2 with this title and I thoroughly enjoyed it as well!
  • Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman – I’m reading this book out loud to my husband and we still haven’t finished it, but it is extremely well written and is another testament to how incredible Gaiman’s talent is!

September 2018

  • Empire of Storms by Sarah J. Maas – This book broke me and the review I wrote of it is my favourite review I have ever written (and possibly one of the shortest too)!

October 2018

  • A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara – This book also broke me, and although a lot of readers have called it torture porn, I really liked it and found it very moving.I don’t regret reading this one whatsoever.
  • Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas – I still can’t talk about this one. I just…can’t.

November 2018

  • Roar by Cecelia Ahern – This was the worst book I read in 2018. I hate to be mean, but it was just way too simplistic and on the nose and cliché.  I was vehemently not a fan of this!
  • The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton – But then again, I really wasn’t a fan of this one either. It was my first try at reading a Morton novel and I regret that I didn’t pick up one of her other books because I’ve noticed that a lot of her fans were confused by this one.  It truly was all over the place.

December 2018

  • The Christmas Secret by Karen Swan – 2018’s second 180 came when I struggled with this novel, even though it was written by an author I adore. But, I guess we can’t always love everything someone writes (unless they’re Neil Gaiman apparently)!
  • Jane by Aline Brosh McKenna & Ramón K. Pérez – I ended 2018 by reading a graphic novel adaptation of my favourite book of all time, Jane Eyreby Charlotte Brontë. And while it didn’t wow me, I was happy to return to some old friends at the end of a long year.

So that’s about it from me.  If you chose to stick around and read this entire round up, thank you so very much!!!

Now, I better get back to my first book of 2019…no time to lose!

xo

Janille N G

Girl with a Green Heart

Three More Reads and No Time to Waste… ~ #JNGReads

Below are three more reviews of books I’ve finished in the last little while, leading up to and around Christmas.  Although I’d love to hang around and chat, there’s no time to lose if I want to finish at least one more book before 2019!  Here goes!

The Christmas Project by Maxine Morrey

This book is adorable, for sure, and was the perfect holiday read! I needed something as light and fluffy as snow, and this choice certainly did not disappoint.

Having said that, it wasn’t the best chick lit. book ever, and although it tried to muster up some references to Jane Eyre (my most favourite novel of all time), it did so too late in the game for me to really take the comparisons seriously. But, like I said, it was FUN…and what more could you ask for around Christmas?

One mini-rant, though: This was the second e-book I read on my new iPhone X (WOO!) and for some reason, it had a glaring number of typos in it. I was not pleased about this, so I wonder if the print version might’ve been a better choice?

Anyway, if you’re looking for a quick holiday read to delve into beside a fire, this is a good choice!

❥❥❥ (out of 5)

Tangled by Emma Chase

I REALLY liked this book!!! I mean, it is an Emma Chase novel so I knew I’d enjoy it and read it quickly, but I wasn’t expecting to like it so much.

I just truly enjoyed Drew’s narration. This was one of the best male narrations written by a female author that I’ve ever read! I found his voice to be so distinct, unique and hilarious, and not at all filled with annoying clichés.

I know this will sound weird, but I also related to Drew’s narration because he reminds me of myself. Okay, so no, I’m not a man who sleeps around…I’m decidedly neither of those things. BUT the way Drew talks to himself, his little one liners and pep talks, reminded me of how I sometimes narrate my own life…you know, doesn’t everyone do that? Anyway, I think if I knew Drew in real-life, I’d actually really like him and laugh a lot!

I’d highly recommend this book for sure because it’s a quick, fun and extremely entertaining read!

❥❥❥❥❥ (out of 5)

How to be a Heroine by Samantha Ellis

Wuthering Heights is a book I think about, one way or another, every day.”

^This describes exactly how I have felt about Jane Eyre since I first read it in grade 12.

“It’s probably unwise to romanticize everything – and I’ll probably always do it.”

What can I say, I just love books where fellow readers talk about the novels and characters they love!  Is this a perfect book?  No, I don’t think so because I sometimes found it hard to follow the threads and connections from one paragraph to another.  However, was it a joy to read about Ellis’ passion for her favourite characters?  Absolutely! And what’s even more amazing is that I came out of reading this book with about 10 new books on my To-Read List…so yes, I am going to continue to be buried by books, but I am excited to delve into some of Ellis’ preferred novels that I haven’t yet read or encountered!

So, although it wasn’t technically perfect, it was a thoroughly enjoyable and lovely read, like sitting down with a best friend to discuss literature over a warm tea!

❥❥❥❥❥ (out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

Two Christmas Books and a Love Story ~ #JNGReads

This week has been crazy and stressful and trying for me, but somehow I managed to finish 3 novels (one of them entirely in one sitting!).  Below are reviews for what I read this week, to get me in the Christmas spirit!

Check out the bookstagram I share with my best friend, Emerald & Opal, to see more bookish photos like this!

One Day in December by Josie Silver

This novel lost momentum towards the second half…or, maybe I’m the one who lost momentum.  In any case, I enjoyed this story but I just felt that the first half, when Laurie and Jack are young and are first coming to terms with the fact that they have a connection but cannot be together, was more touching than the latter half. Really, as soon as Oscar entered into the mix, my interest started to wane a bit, and I found Jack and Laurie to be a bit less endearing as they grew older.  However, overall I found this story to be very entertaining and there were definitely many moments when my chest felt tight and my heart was racing. I even had faint tears in my eyes at times, because for whatever reason, I felt like I could really picture Laurie and her big, sad but hopeful eyes, and could feel her pain and agony at loving a man she could not have.

I would certainly recommend this novel as a Christmas read.  It didn’t necessarily blow me away from start to finish, but it had enough moments that were touching and the story was a lot more mature and intricate than I expected for a chick lit. novel.

❥❥❥.5(out of 5)

The Christmas Secret by Karen Swan

Karen Swan is one of my favourite authors, and so, because I didn’t love this one, I don’t want to say too much about it. I was having a rough week while reading this, so I don’t know if my feelings toward it have to do with the book or me. In any case, I WILL read more of Karen Swan’s books (I have 3 unread on my bookshelf right now) in the future!

❥❥❥ (out of 5)

Love Story by Erich Segal

What possessed me to read this incredibly sad novel before Christmas?  I truly have no idea.

I should mention that I have wanted to read Love Story for many years.  I remember distinctly watching bits and pieces of the movie on TV one day when I was in high school with my mom.  To be honest, I don’t remember much of the movie (I am intending to properly watch it now that I’ve finished the book), but I have held onto the feeling that I should read the book ever since encountering the movie.  I knew the book would be sad (that much, I remembered from the movie), but I am a hopeless romantic so I figured that at some point I had to read the novel literally called Love Story.

It wasn’t at all what I expected, to be honest.  It was as sad and heart-wrenching as I thought it would be, but I had no idea that it was told from Oliver’s perspective and I was not expecting to be so drawn in by his character and narrative voice.  I was kind of thinking that he would be some vapid rich kid, but it turns out that he is a man full of heart and sensitivity.  Jenny is as hilarious and sassy as I thought she would be, and my only criticism is that the book was very short and the love story was quite condensed and much less fleshed out than I would’ve assumed it would be given how popular it is and how beloved the film adaptation is.  But, having said that, I was able to finish the entire novel in one sitting, so that is definitely a testament to how enjoyable and easy it was to read about Oliver and Jenny.

The ending is heartbreaking and sudden, there’s no doubt about that, but overall I must say that I am really glad I got around to reading this one and I think it is the perfect read for a Sunday afternoon curled up under the covers with the person you love.

❥❥❥❥ (out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

A Soothing Balm to Remedy Another Mediocre Reading Experience ~ #JNGReads

Just a quick update on this Sunday night!

I recently finished two novels.  The first, The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton, I found to be very disappointing, dry and confusing.  For that reason, I decided to move right into re-reading an absolute favourite novel of mine, A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas, which, needless to say, took my heart in its clutches yet again.  Short reviews for both of these novels are below, if you’re at all interested.

Thank you for reading, as always! xo

The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton

Oh dear.

I really wanted to like this book because I’ve been hearing about Kate Morton for so long and truly expected to be touched by her work. But, I had a lot of trouble following the threads of this story, and while certain chapters were interesting and touched me (such as the ones about Elodie in the beginning and those devoted to Juliet and her young children), I just didn’t ever feel that engrossed in the plot and I found my mind wandering on several occasions. Sadly, I think this story was just too disjointed, and the things that were promised, like romance and suspense, were sorely lacking. There also was no real sense of resolution, particularly with characters like Elodie and Jack, and I found myself confused as to the point of all of the characters. This story didn’t need to be as complex as it was and probably would have been easier to follow, better written and more enjoyable if characters like Elodie, Jack, Lauren, Ada, Leonard, Juliet and Tip were excluded (not to mention unnecessary side characters like Pippa, Alastair and Penelope). Basically, I wonder why, if this book is called The Clockmaker’s Daughter, it didn’t simply stick to her storyline and call it a day?!

Pretty disappointed with this one, unfortunately!

❥❥ (out of 5)

 

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

(Reading for the second time.)

Somehow, I thought that re-reading this novel, knowing what would happen, might make it a little easier…and yet, I feel like I could throw up right now at the end of it.

Somehow, knowing what Rhys is to Feyre from the beginning made their courtship, his evident uncertainty and longing throughout, that much more agonizing and heart-wrenching.  Somehow, remembering what would occur in the final chapters, how their bond would be severed (even if not truly), made me at once anxious and terrified to get to the end. Somehow, getting to spend more wonderful time with characters I have grown to love and think about almost every single day since encountering them for the first time made saying goodbye to them again, just moments, ago that much harder.

Re-reading a favourite book isn’t always easy, I guess…but somehow, sometimes, it just feels necessary.  It feels like coming home after a long day to a couch by a fireplace, in a townhouse surrounded by snow and night, and sitting curled up beside a dear old friend.

This novel touched my heart last year when I read it for the first time, and as my heart ached last weekend, I knew it was the one balm I needed to revisit.  For that, it will always get infinite stars (oh, how fitting!), from me.

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart

Roar ~ #JNGReads

You can find more photos like this one on my bookstagram, Emerald & Opal.

I have to start this review with a disclaimer. The opinions that follow are simply my opinions about the short story collection Roar by Cecelia Ahern. If you particularly liked this collection, you may not enjoy this review.

I seriously considered not posting a review of Roar because, to be honest, I don’t have much that’s nice to say about it. Roar is a short story collection that I can understand why a lot of people like, particularly at this moment in history. The collection contains thirty stories about women and each one plays on a popular turn of phrase, image or metaphor. There is the woman who thinks her mirror is broken because she looks aged in it. There is the immigrant woman who literally grows wings and flies away, finally free. There is the woman whose husband keeps her on a shelf for the world to see and admire but not interact with. These ideas are certainly relevant, and Ahern plays on societal concerns that are on everyone’s minds and makes them into fairytales full of magical realism.

However, in my opinion, Ahern doesn’t do social commentary very well. While her stories make sense, they are not creative and they are, ultimately, very silly. These common phrases or metaphors, such as wanting to fall into a hole and die when something embarrassing happens, are definitely used in common speech on a daily basis, but they don’t make for good or interesting fiction. Each of these stories is full of oversimplification and they border on the nonsensical. While magical realism is meant to be a bit outlandish, Ahern’s tales are downright ridiculous, and I found myself laughing every so often at how absurd and literal they are. Everything is just too on the nose and it gets to be very annoying and irritating very quickly.

What’s more, Ahern spends a lot of her time pandering to her reader. Her stories are simplistic enough that they hardly need explanation, but Ahern still feels the need to spell out exactly what each symbol means in detail. When a woman has bite marks spontaneously appear on her skin in one story, after returning to work from maternity leave, it seems unnecessary to be given a sentence like, “The guilt was, quite literally, eating her alive”, italics and all. And yet, Ahern constantly offers these analyses of her own stories, and it made me feel as though I was being talked down to or not being trusted to draw my own conclusions and insights from this fiction. There are such wonderful female short story writers out there like Alice Munro and Mavis Gallant who write about women being trapped in their hometowns or about women feeling displaced and exiled in ways that are subtle and nuanced. Ahern doesn’t do this at all, and I personally found that her stories came across as childish and unsophisticated because of it.

Don’t get me wrong, there was one story I sort of liked – The Woman Who Forgot Her Name – but one story out of thirty isn’t at all what I was hoping for. In the end, I got very clearly what Ahern was trying to do…but I wished she had tried harder to do it better.

❥❥ (out of 5)

JNG

Girl with a Green Heart